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Game Worn Jersey 101


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Game Worn Jersey - Game Wear

There are many different signs of wear that you will find on a game worn jersey. Understanding game wear is perhaps the most important aspect in authenticating a jersey. Again, remember to do your homework. If you can find out the year of the jersey and how many games the player played, that will help in assessing the amount of wear on a jersey.

Wear is not just what happens on the ice but off. The jerseys will get washed and the jerseys will show signs of this. Below is a list of some types of wear you will find in a game jersey.

Black Marks You will find black marks on jerseys. Mostly from the tape on opposing players sticks. These marks can be very useful when trying to photo match a jersey. The first large stick mark is from a Lindros jersey which is photo matched. The last is from a Lowe Oilers jersey photo matched to him holding the Stanley Cup in 87-88. mark large.jpg (35330 bytes) marks.jpg (83293 bytes)

mark lowe.jpg (147951 bytes)
Board Paint The boards in arenas have paint on them from the boarder to the advertising. When players hit the boards the friction can cause some paint marks to be left on the jersey. The first photo here is of a Montreal jersey. This red paint is often found on their home jerseys.  board paint habs.jpg (61565 bytes) board paint.jpg (19782 bytes) 

paint sutter.jpg (126524 bytes)
Goal Post Paint Red paint from the goal posts can end up on a players jersey, especially a goaltender. goal post paint.jpg (153658 bytes) post snow.jpg (81311 bytes)

post ter.jpg (61828 bytes)
Board Burns These usually occur from the friction of a player going into the boards. The fabric of the jersey actually melts to varying degrees. burn hole.jpg (79648 bytes) burn 88 nyr.jpg (113361 bytes)

burn 88 fly.jpg (139754 bytes)
Tears & Holes Jerseys can get tears and holes. This can occur from regular game play or from fights or just clutching and grabbing during a skirmish. hole tears.jpg (94881 bytes)
Repairs When a jersey gets a hole or tear they are sometimes repaired by the team, by sewing them up. One of the tools a authenticator will use is knowing how different teams repair jerseys. The first jersey shows a typical circular Montreal repair. The last a typical 80's Flyers repair with thick thread. repairs habs.jpg (136114 bytes) repairs edm.jpg (161333 bytes)

rep fly.jpg (92104 bytes)
Stains The jerseys can show signs of sweat, maybe blood that can stain a jersey. stain blood.jpg (69864 bytes)
Rust and Salt Most fight straps have metal buttons. These can develop salt deposits from players sweat. They can also rust from sweat or washing. salt rust.jpg (51772 bytes) salt.jpg (42136 bytes)


Pilling
Some jersey materials can show pilling on the inside or outside of a jersey. Pilling is when friction from a stick, equipment, causes the jersey to develop little pilled balls of the jersey material. You usually find this on the inside of the jersey, in the arms, back of the neck, or collar. On the outside you will see this on the cuffs, neck.



pilling 99.jpg (149016 bytes)
pilling roe.jpg (106210 bytes)



Fraying
This happens to the numbers, name, and crest. When the threads start to fray.

 
Washing Jerseys will show some signs of washing. Most notably the numbers will not be as stiff. Tags in the jersey will also be softer. Sometimes the color will bleed. The best place to find this is the possible discoloration of the fight strap.

wash chi.jpg (61624 bytes)
tag wash.jpg (126161 bytes)

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